A musical gift for the new year

Another year almost gone! I’m sorry I have not posted many stories this year, but you know how it is. Nobody told me that time speeds up the older you get. Dirty trick if you ask me. Anyway, whether you are a regular reader or you have just stumbled on this blog, please accept my best wishes for 2020, and many thanks to those who have contributed comments and “likes”.

My prezzy is a recent memory – one of my personal 2019 highlights, an evening with the Unthanks. (Who? Read on….) I hope you like it. It might cheer you up in these nightmare days of Trump, Boris, Brexit and other insane causes for depression. Escapism? You bet.

The Unthanks?

Continue reading

Prefabs update: Pilgrims Way talk

Pilgrims Way NW9, looking toward Barn Hill. Origin unknownPretty much as I remember itFellow Pilgrims Way denizen Paul Kennedy recently sent me a file used to illustrate a talk by Philip Grant of the Wembley Historical Society. The talk covered all the prefab estates built just after the war in Wembley, including Pilgrims way, and draws on evidence held by Brent Archives. The Pilgrims Way section is about half way through the talk, and includes a letter from Charlie Watts and some images I have not seen before. Thanks Paul!

Here are some of the slides Philip used, but you can also download the complete presentation Kingsbury’s Post-War Prefab Homes (pdf file – 8Mb) Continue reading

Twinning is alive – at least where I live.

According to some in the media, twinning is doomed. Sadly there is some evidence to support that view, internationally, but the twinned villages of Woodhall Spa and Roëzé are bucking the alleged trend. Earlier this year a doughty band of Woodhall Spa and district families once again crossed the Channel to spend a long weekend with their French hosts en famille, and plans are now being drawn up for the next return visit in 2017.

As yet, dates have not been set, but  a recent survey of current WSTA members indicates continued willingness to offer slices of English life once again next year. It does seem likely that demand will exceed supply, so the association is once again on the lookout for new families. Continue reading

Taking Off: Exploring Cultural Education in Lincolnshire

We all want the best for our children and grandchildren, but sometimes opportunities for enriching their development are hard to come by in a county like Lincolnshire, especially outside our main towns. Fortunately, help is now at hand.

 

Last December over 50 cultural, arts and education professionals attended an event called “What if Every Child Could Fly in Lincolnshire?” to demonstrate their passion and enthusiasm in supporting all children and young people in the county in having the opportunity to experience great arts and culture. The event was so successful that a follow-up event is planned. Continue reading

A new way to decorate your Christmas tree…….

…….which you can see for yourself in St Botolph’s Church (aka the Stump) in Boston Lincolnshire until January. 3,000 Christmas tree stars and a nativity scene knitted by people across Lincolnshire, all dedicated to family, friends, memories and even pets.

Called Christmas Knitivity, this imaginative project was organised by BBC Radio Lincolnshire in partnership with St Botolph’s Church. Local radio staffers and Boston parishioners got together with Oldrids store to decorate more than 30 trees with these unusual emblems. Continue reading

Where were you when Mrs T resigned?

The media are making a predictable meal this week out of the 25th anniversary of Margaret Thatcher’s resignation and Bernard Ingham’s revelations about the shenanigans that led up to it. The current hoo-ha immediately reminded of where I was on November 22nd 1990 at 9.30am, when the news broke.

I was sitting in a well-known café in pre-gentrification Leeds city centre, staring out at drizzle-soaked passers-by, when the news was announced on the radio (it might have been on the telly,) just audible over the desultory chatter in the room. Not everyone there heard it immediately, but within seconds everyone got up and cheered and waved. That’s what the people of Leeds thought of Margaret Thatcher after eleven plus years of Tory government.

Oddly I cannot for the life of me remember where I was when President Kennedy was assassinated, but I do remember when the King George VI died, February 6th 1952. I was out shopping with my mum in Neasden (NW10) and we saw the news on a newspaper stand poster. Nobody cheered that day, I bet.

Bernard Ingham’s account in the Yorkshire Post

George Boole Update: Film premiere at the Collection

By way of an update to my previous posts about the Lincoln born father of digital technology George Boole, Dave Kenyon writes:

Friends of George Boole,

I thought you might be interested in the UK premiere of the Irish film about George Boole. It’s at 2pm this Sunday 25th Oct at the Collection. It’s part of a longer programme, but the Boole film is 58 mins long. Attendance is free but ticketed.

The film is presented as part of the current Frequency Festival in Lincoln. Tickets are available here. (Get your free tickets by clicking on the green “register” button.)