Grist to the mill

windmills_150Lincolnshire has more working windmills than any other county in the UK, according to the Lincolnshire Mills Group.

Mary Cook writes: Around 800 windmills were grinding flour for Lincolnshire’s inhabitants up to a century ago. But winds of change have blown across the county, leaving some mills in ruins while giving others a new lease of life. Local government organizations, charitable trusts and private enterprise have been working to convert them into tourist attractions.

Visit the Maud Foster Mill, Boston.

This windmill is close to Boston town centre – just off the A16/A52 Grimsby/Skegness road and there is a free car park for mill visitors. On foot the windmill is a 10 minute stroll from the market square and the historic Boston Stump church. It’s hard to miss! Continue reading

Taking Off: Exploring Cultural Education in Lincolnshire

We all want the best for our children and grandchildren, but sometimes opportunities for enriching their development are hard to come by in a county like Lincolnshire, especially outside our main towns. Fortunately, help is now at hand.

 

Last December over 50 cultural, arts and education professionals attended an event called “What if Every Child Could Fly in Lincolnshire?” to demonstrate their passion and enthusiasm in supporting all children and young people in the county in having the opportunity to experience great arts and culture. The event was so successful that a follow-up event is planned. Continue reading

A new way to decorate your Christmas tree…….

…….which you can see for yourself in St Botolph’s Church (aka the Stump) in Boston Lincolnshire until January. 3,000 Christmas tree stars and a nativity scene knitted by people across Lincolnshire, all dedicated to family, friends, memories and even pets.

Called Christmas Knitivity, this imaginative project was organised by BBC Radio Lincolnshire in partnership with St Botolph’s Church. Local radio staffers and Boston parishioners got together with Oldrids store to decorate more than 30 trees with these unusual emblems. Continue reading

Gibraltar Point update

Last Friday I took another trip out to Gibraltar Point, conscious that the building of the new visitor centre must now be well advanced. I was not wrong. The weather was unseasonably fine and sunny all the way there but, as is often the case, the point was shrouded in sea mist when I arrived.

Undaunted I took some shots of the visitor centre development from the car park on my much-derided and battered Nokia mobile, then dropped in to the temporary shop and café. I was working on the theory that the mist would clear as there was an offshore wind blowing. It seemed a fair gamble, having driven all the way there.

This strategy turned out well. Continue reading

Gibraltar Point, an East Coast miracle

I would like to believe a yarn heard about Gibraltar Point, a windswept nature reserve on the Lincolnshire coast, near Skegness. The story goes that one day the driver of a huge articulated truck from somewhere in eastern Europe pulled into the Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust Car park there and seemed surprised that there was no sign of a car ferry to Morocco.

Seems he was using a satnav. Not as surprised perhaps as the wildlife trust ranger.

Hard to believe, but true or not, I am reminded of the story every time we go to this wonderful miniature wilderness, all the more fascinating for the extreme contrast with one of England’s iconic seaside towns, only two miles away. Continue reading

Blown off course, but land is in sight

Martin_phonebox_crop_150I have been distracted lately by working on a new blog for my home village of Kirkby on Bain, Lincolnshire. I have to admit I was sceptical about the idea, but how wrong can you be? To my surprise, after only a few days, it’s a hit, at least round here, and oddly satisfying to work on, especially after the extreme frustrations of working for the local University.

Come to think of it, this turn of events rather bears out my growing conviction that websites, including blogs, tend to work best when there is a ready-made audience, or constituency, regardless of numbers. Building an audience is much harder.

The most-read story so far is about that great British icon, the red telephone box, and how it has been saved from extinction in our village. Give it a whirl.

However, fear not, I do have a lot more of my own stories to tell here, and I hope to have normal service resumed fairly soon.